March 2009

Volume 26, Issue 1

Caries prevalence and fluoride use in low SES children in Clermont-Ferrand (France)

Authors: S. Tubert-Jeannin P.J. Riordan R. Manevy M.M. Lecuyer E. Pegon-Machat
doi: 10.1922/CDH_2226Jeannin06

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the association between dental caries experience and preventive behaviours of children residing in a deprived area in Clermont-Ferrand (France). Participants and methods All 4-5 yr-olds attending nine schools in deprived areas of the city were invited to participate and 81% (n=282) consented and were examined. Dental caries was recorded at the dentine threshold. Parents completed a questionnaire concerning family demographics and the child’s use of fluoride. Non-parametric tests and logistic regression assessed the relative importance of SES and fluoride variables on dental status (dt>1). Results Fifty four (19%) of the examined children were living in families with an immigrant background, 33% were fully covered by the national health insurance programme for deprived families. Caries experience was high; mean dft was 1.94 (3.31) and 30% of the children had >1 carious teeth. Thirty percent of the families reported using fluoridated salt. Tooth brushing once daily was reported for 39% and twice daily for 26%. Parents declared supervising tooth brushing for 60%. Two thirds of the children, according to their parents, used fluoride supplement between birth and two years. Supervised tooth brushing was significantly correlated with lower mean dt scores. Systemic fluoride use was poorly related to dental caries Immigrant background, family size, type of health insurance and mother’s unemployment were significantly correlated with caries prevalence. In multivariate analysis, immigrant status, supervised tooth brushing and parental knowledge about fluoride in toothpastes were significant caries predictors. Conclusions The majority of low SES children did not practice effective caries prevention; few reported twice daily brushing with fluoride toothpaste. Caries experience was very high and much was untreated. Immigrant status, supervised tooth brushing and parental knowledge about fluoride in toothpastes were significant caries predictors. Key words : Children, dental caries, fluoride, inequalities, socio-economic status

£10 single article

Other articles in this issue

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Editorial - Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health. A Report of the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) 2008. 2-3 £10 single article
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Predictive tool for estimating the potential effect of water fluoridation on dental caries 5-11 £10 single article
Dental caries prevalence and distribution among preschoolers in Singapore 12-17 £10 single article
Oral health in German children, adolescents, adults and senior citizens in 2005 18-22 £10 single article
Caries prevalence and fluoride use in low SES children in Clermont-Ferrand (France) 23-28 £10 single article
Previous radiographic experience of children referred for dental extractions under general anaesthesia in the UK. 29-31 £10 single article
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Childhood growth and dental caries 38-42 £10 single article
Measurement of attitudes of UK dental practitioners to core job constructs. 43-51 £10 single article
Dental general anaesthesia - will the service disappear? A pilot study 52-57 £10 single article
Orthodontic treatment need and oral health-related quality among children 58-61 £10 single article
Short Communication - Changing dental caries levels in the 1980’s, 1990’s and 2005 among children of a Jerusalem region. 62-64 £10 single article

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